Employers Beware: Labor Law Poster Vendor Scams

Canadian Minimum Wage Increases

Minimum wage workers in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island will soon be getting a raise.

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia will be raising its tiered minimum wage by two percent on April 1, 2015.

Experienced workers will receive $10.60 an hour and inexperienced workers will receive $10.10.

  • Experienced Workers – Employees who have worked in a position for their employers for three months or have performed similar work for another employer for at least three months.
  • Inexperienced WorkersEmployees who have less than three months of experience in their present role and had not been employed in a similar role for different employer for three months.

Nova Scotia’s minimum wage rates are adjusted annually, based on the national Consumer Price Index from 2014.

Nova Scotia has the fifth highest minimum wage in the country, behind Nunavut, Yukon, Manitoba and Ontario.

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island’s non-unionized minimum wage workers will get a 15 cent increase to their pay beginning July 1, 2015. This is the third time the minimum wage rate has increased in just over a year. The rate will rise from $10.35 to $10.50 per hour.

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Do you need seamless labor law posting compliance for all your North American locations?

GovDocs provides large employers with a variety of posting compliance solutions for employment locations in the U.S. and Canada. Contact us today to learn how we can streamline your North American posting compliance program. [contact-form to=’dthompson@govdocs.com’ subject=’Canadian Compliance Interest from govdocs.com’][contact-field label=’Your Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Company Name’ type=’text’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Tell Us About Your North American Locations ‘ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form] [wc_divider style=”solid” line=”single” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=””] [gravityform id=”2″ title=”true” description=”true”]

Alberta Increases Its Minimum Wage

On September 1, 2014, Alberta will join Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and Ontario by raising its minimum wage. Most employees will receive an hourly wage of $10.20, while those who serve liquor will receive an hourly wage of $9.20, taking tips into account.

The increase for Alberta is based on a formula that links the general wage rate to annual increases in average weekly earnings and the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Based on last year’s average weekly earnings, this translates into a 25 cent per hour increase.

Only 1.5 percent of employees in Alberta earn minimum wage, compared to Ontario with 9 percent of its employees earning minimum wage.

If you have more questions on this wage increase, see the minimum wage fact sheet or the Employment Standards Regulation.


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Saskatchewan Minimum Wage Increase, Revised Posting

Saskatchewan repealed its Labour Standards Act replacing it with an amendment to The Saskatchewan Employment Act known as the Minimum Wage Regulations, 2014 (R.R.S., c. S-15.1, Reg. 3).

As part of the amended language, the Minister of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety will adjust Saskatchewan’s minimum wage each year based on changes to the Consumer Price Index. The Province announced that it will increase the minimum wage rate to $10.20 per hour effective October 1, 2014.

A copy of Saskatchewan’s Minimum Wage Regulations, 2014 must be posted by every employer “in a conspicuous position in the place where employees are engaged in their duties” according to the Act.

GovDocs provides North America’s largest employers labor law poster compliance coverage for all 10 Provinces in Canada, U.S. State and Territories, and 52 Cities in the U.S.

Contact us to learn more about how we can help you streamline posting compliance for your North American operations.


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Manitoba Employers Must Display Harassment Prevention Policy

Each employer with workplace locations in Manitoba must post a copy of their company’s workplace harassment prevention policy in a prominent location. The Manitoba Human Rights Commission has developed guidelines for employers for creating workplace harassment policies.

The harassment prevention policy must provide information on the following:

  • How to make a harassment complaint
  • How a harassment complaint will be investigated
  • How the complainant and alleged harasser will be informed of the results of the investigation

What is Harassment in Manitoba?

Workplace harassment is more than simple “joking around”. Harassment is the act of ongoing intimidating behavior meant to demean a person. Manitoba’s Human Rights Commission defines harassment as:

“…any behaviour that degrades, demeans, humiliates, or embarrasses a person, and that a reasonable person should have known would be unwelcome. It includes actions (e.g. touching, pushing), comments (e.g. jokes, name-calling) or displays (e.g. posters, cartoons). Harassment can also take place electronically.”

Although harassment is typically associated with the behaviors of employees targeting other employees, an employer may be held liable when a non-employee is the source of harassment. In the case of Garland v. Grape & Grain, a Manitoba employer was found liable when a regular customer repeatedly made lewd comments to a female employee. The Commission ruled that the employer did not take adequate measures to create a work environment in which the employee felt safe.

When Harassment Becomes Sexual Harassment in Manitoba

Harassment becomes sexual harassment when the intimidating behavior includes offensive and unwelcome actions or speech related to a person’s gender or sexuality.


Free Workplace Harassment Policy Template

GovDocs has developed a Microsoft Word version of Manitoba’s workplace harassment prevention policy document that your company can use as a starting point for developing a workplace harassment policy document that complies with Province requirements. Simply find and replace the exact phrase OUR COMPANY with the name of your company to get started making this harassment policy document your own.

Download the free Manitoba Workplace Harassment Prevention Policy Document HERE.


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Nova Scotia Raises Minimum Wage Rate

Nova Scotia minimum wage workers will receive a one-percent raise beginning April 1, 2014.

The Province offers two tiers of minimum wage, one for experienced workers and one for inexperienced workers.

The new minimum wage rate for experienced employees in Nova Scotia is $10.40 per hour. For inexperienced employees, the new rate is $9.90 per hour.

Experienced and Inexperienced Employees in Nova Scotia

Experienced: Employees qualify for the experienced rate if they have worked in a position for their employers for three months or if they have performed similar work for another employer for at least three months.

Inexperienced: Employees are classified as inexperienced employees if they have less than three months of experience in their present role and had not been employed in a similar role for different employer for three months.

Nova Scotia Overtime

Minimum wage workers in Nova Scotia are eligible for overtime pay at a rate of one-and-a-half times their regular rate for hours worked after 48 hours within a work week.


Do you need seamless labor law posting compliance for all your North American locations?

GovDocs provides large employers with a variety of posting compliance solutions for employment locations in the U.S. and Canada. Contact us today to learn how we can streamline your North America [contact-form to=’dthompson@govdocs.com’ subject=’Canadian Compliance Interest from govdocs.com’][contact-field label=’Your Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Company Name’ type=’text’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Tell Us About Your North American Locations ‘ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form] n posting compliance program.

 

 

Ontario Increases Minimum Wage

Minimum wage workers in Ontario received a pay increase to $11.00 per hour beginning June 1, 2014. The 75-cent adjustment reflects more than a seven-percent increase from the previous rate of $10.25 and will affect the 535,000 minimum wage workers in Canada’s most populous province. The rate had been frozen since 2010.

Ontario’s legislature must yet agree over a bill that ties annual increases to the consumer price index.

Ontario’s new hourly rate will tie Nunavut for Canada’s highest minimum wage rate.

According to the Ontario Ministry of Labour:

“Minimum wage is the lowest wage rate an employer can pay an employee. Most employees are eligible for minimum wage, whether they are full-time, part-time, casual employees, or are paid an hourly rate, commission, piece rate, flat rate or salary.”

The Ontario minimum wage rate appears on the the province’s Employment Standards Act posting, which is required for employers to display. That posting, along with other required postings, is included on the GovDocs Province-on-One poster in both English and French.


Need Canadian Posting Compliance Coverage?

GovDocs provides posting compliance coverage for all 10 Canadian provinces. If you need to streamline your posting compliance for your North American operations, contact GovDocs today to learn about program options and pricing.

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Bullying Employer K.O.’d in Ontario Workplace Violence and Failure-to-Post Case

Aldo Sarra, supervisor for Pro-Cut Concrete Cutting Ltd., physically assaulted John Owens, one of Sarra’s employees. Less than two weeks later, Sarra threatened to kill another employee, Jean-Guy Herron.

Both Owens and Herron were members in good standing of the Labourers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA). The union promptly filed a workplace violence grievance with the Ontario Labour Relations Board (OLRB) who found that Sarra’s actions violated Bill 168 (also known as the Bully-Busting Bill). Bill 168 introduced workplace violence provisions into Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA).

Additionally, an OLRB investigation concluded that Pro-Cut Concrete Cutting did not post the workplace violence and harassment policies or programs, as required by Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act. Pro-Cut Concrete Cutting did not participate in the hearing.

Outcomes

Pro-Cut Concrete Cutting was ordered to:

  • Comply with the Province’s OHSA.
  • Provide full compensation to Herron and Owens for hours worked and vacation time.

The OLRB scheduled a separate hearing to consider assessing damages for mental distress to the employees who were victims of workplace violence.

Ontario OHSA Posting Requirements

Employers with locations in Ontario are required to:

  • Post a copy of the OHSA and explanatory material, both in English and the majority language of the workplace, outlining the rights, responsibilities and duties of workers.
  • Prepare and review at least annually a written occupational health and safety policy and develop and maintain a program to implement that policy.
  • Post a copy of the occupational health and safety policy.
  • Provide to an employer-designate health and safety committee or to a health and safety representative the results of a health and safety data (injuries, illnesses, etc.).
  • Advise workers of the results of the health and safety report (if the report is in writing, employers must make it available to employees in written form).

About the OLRB

The Ontario Labour Relations Board is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal mandated to mediate and adjudicate a variety of employment and labor relations-related matters under a number of Ontario statutes. They provide guidance on cases involving:

  • Establishing or terminating bargaining rights in a workplace
  • Trade unions’ duty of fair representation or referral of its members
  • Unfair labor practices by any workplace party
  • Illegal strikes or lockouts
  • Grievances to arbitration in the construction industry
  • Accreditation in the construction industry
  • Unlawful reprisals

Need Help Navigating Canadian Labor Law Posting Requirements?

If you have multiple employment locations in the U.S. and Canada and would like to simplify your labor law poster compliance program, visit GovDocs’ Canadian Posting Compliance page to learn more about how we can help.