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San Francisco 2015 Minimum Wage Increase

San Francisco employers must pay workers at least $12.25 per hour beginning May 1, 2015.

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Voters passed Proposition J in November 2014, raising the minimum wage to $15.00 by 2018 in scheduled increases. Beginning in 2019, the San Francisco minimum wage rate will be adjusted annually based on changes to the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

San Francisco Minimum Wage Increase Schedule

The San Francisco minimum wage will increase according to the following schedule:

Effective Date Minimum Wage Rate
5/1/2015 $12.25
7/1/2016 $13.00
7/1/2017 $14.00
7/1/2018 $15.00
July 1 2019 and beyond CPI Increase

San Francisco Minimum Wage Notice and Posting Requirements

The San Francisco Minimum Wage Ordinance (MWO) requires every employer to post notices in English, Spanish, Chinese and:

“…in and any other language spoken by at least five percent of the Employees at the workplace or job site.”

Employers must also provide each employee the employer’s name, address and telephone number in writing at the time of hire.

The San Francisco Office of Labor Standards Enforcement is authorized to fine employers $500 for each instance of failing to post or failing to provide the employer’s contact information in writing.

San Francisco Compliance Posters

Subscribers to GovDocs labor law news can take an additional 20% off of their purchase of the GovDocs San Francisco City Posting Compliance Package by using coupon code BLOG20. The package contains the new San Francisco 2015 Minimum Wage posting and other postings required for San Francisco employers:

  • San Francisco Minimum Wage (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco Paid Sick Leave (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco No Smoking
  • San Francisco Health Care Security Ordinance (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco Family Friendly Workplace (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco Fair Chance Ordinance posting
  • San Francisco Employment Discrimination is Against the Law

GovDocs City Posting Coverage

San Francisco is just one of more than 40 cities in the U.S. that issues postings required or recommended for employers. Thanks to the nationwide trend of tying minimum wage rates to cost-of-living adjustments (like in San Francisco beginning 2019), more and more workplace postings require frequent replacement.

For large employers (businesses with 50 or more locations), GovDocs suggests using an automatic compliance program to ensure uninterrupted posting coverage for all your employees. Request a price quote from GovDocs today.

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San Francisco Releases New Employment Discrimination Posting

The City of San Francisco’s Human Rights Commission released a new posting required for all employers with a business tax registration certificate from the City or that hold contracts with the City.

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The new San Francisco workplace discrimination notice informs employees and independent contractors that employers and persons engaging the services of an independent contractor are prohibited from discriminating against protected persons during recruitment, hiring, training, promotion and termination.

The posting points out that retaliation for filing complaints of discrimination is illegal and the employers must provide reasonable accommodation for persons with disabilities. Additionally, the posting reiterates that City contractors must offer equal benefits to employees with domestic partners.

Which San Francisco Workers are Protected from Employment Discrimination?

Article 33 of the San Francisco Police Code prohibits employers from taking adverse employment action against protected classes of individuals based on:

  • Race / Color / National origin / Place of birth
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Marital status
  • Ancestry
  • Sex
  • Age
  • Religion / Creed
  • Disability
  • Sexual orientation / Gender identity
  • Weight / Height

An employer commits unlawful discrimination by refusing to hire, firing, under-compensating, or making less favorable terms of employment for workers protected by the Article.

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San Francisco City Posters

The GovDocs San Francisco City Poster Package includes postings by required for employers and businesses providing contracted services to the City of San Francisco:

  • San Francisco Minimum Wage (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco Paid Sick Leave (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco No Smoking
  • San Francisco Health Care Security Ordinance (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco Family Friendly Workplace (6-Language version)
  • San Francisco Fair Chance Ordinance posting
  • San Francisco Employment Discrimination is Against the Law

Subscribers to the GovDocs blog can use coupon code BLOG20 to save 20% on the San Francisco City Poster Compliance Package.

City Postings in the U.S.

Currently more than 40 cities require postings for some or all employers, and GovDocs monitors more those and a dozen more cities in the U.S. for new postings and posting updates. City posting coverage is just another reason why North America’s largest employers trust GovDocs for ongoing posting compliance.

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Move Over San Francisco – Richmond, Calif. to Take Top U.S. Minimum Wage

Above and beyond, that’s what the City of Richmond, California was striving for as they passed a minimum wage ordinance that would create a citywide minimum wage reaching $12.30 per hour by 2017, if the ordinance achieves final approval in May.

Beginning in 2018, the rate would be tied to Consumer Price Index to allow for cost-of-living increases.

Businesses with 10 or fewer employees would be exempt but would be subject to the California state minimum wage or Federal rate.

If approved, Richmond’s minimum wage rate would lead the six U.S. cities that have established their own rates. The other five include:

  • San Francisco, California – $10.74
  • San Jose, California – $10.15
  • Baltimore, Maryland – $7.25
  • Albuquerque, New Mexico – $8.60
  • Santa Fe, New Mexico – $10.51

JUNE 3, 2014 UPDATESEATTLE RAISES MINIMUM WAGE TO $15 PER HOUR

Seatac, Washington established a $15.00 per hour minimum wage for only hospitality and transportation workers, but the rate does not apply to employees across all industries in the city.

Oklahoma recently passed emergency legislation prohibiting its municipalities from establishing independent minimum wage rates.


Keep Informed of Labor Law News

San Francisco Limits Employers’ Applicant Background Checks

The City and County of San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed the Ordinance and Mayor Edwin M. Lee signed it into law. The new ordinance (San Francisco Police Code, Article 49) limits the use of criminal history information in pre-employment screening and goes into effect August 13, 2014.

Similar language was added to the City’s Administrative Code to require City contractors and subcontractors to adhere to the same limits when making decisions regarding employment of persons for work on City contracts and subcontracts.

San Francisco is the fifth municipality in the U.S. to restrict criminal background checks during employment screening: Buffalo, Newark, Philadelphia, and Seattle are the other four. Four states also “ban the box”: Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Rhode Island.

New Restrictions for San Francisco Employers

Employers with 20 or more employees, City contractors, and housing providers are prohibited from requiring job applicants to disclose any conviction history or unresolved arrests until either after the first live interview with the person after a conditional offer of employment. Regardless, there are some details regarding an applicant’s criminal history that remain off limits during all stages of the hiring process. Employers are prohibited from asking applicants about or requiring disclosure of:

  • Arrests not leading to a conviction.
  • Participation in or completion of a diversion or a deferral of judgment program.
  • Convictions that have been dismissed or expunged.
  • Juvenile justice system convictions or adjudications.
  • Convictions more than seven years old.
  • Information pertaining to an offense other than a felony or misdemeanor, such as an infraction.

New Hiring Processes for San Francisco Employers

  • Posting Requirement: The City’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE) produced a posting ahead of the August 13, 2014 posting deadline. The new posting details applicant and employee rights under the “ban the box” ordinance. The posting will be available in English, Spanish, Chinese, and all languages spoken by more than 5% of the San Francisco workforce.
  • Employment Solicitations: Employers must state in all job solicitations and employment advertisements that the Employer will consider for employment qualified applicants with criminal histories.
  • Copy to Applicant: Prior to conducting a conviction history inquiry, an Employer must provide the applicant a copy of the notice.


City Posting Coverage

San Francisco is one of 52 cities covered by GovDocs’ Update Program coverage for labor law posting compliance. When you need seamless compliance for the U.S. and Canada, contact us!

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