Retaliation: Woman fired for Discrimination Complaint

Things blow up after company punished female employee for complaining about unlawful discrimination and hostile work environment.

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A male site superintendent at the Brunswick Nuclear Power Plant in South Carolina harassed a female planner who was hired to address a power outage. She notified company management, and according to her complaint, the site superintendent created a hostile work environment by being “aggressive, intimidating, sarcastic, and condescending” with her because she was a woman.

To the company’s credit, a vice president completed a relatively prompt investigation into the female worker’s complaint. To the company’s discredit, the Vice President fired her two days later.

The EEOC announced a settlement with the company on April 27, 2015. The company must pay $65,000 to the victim who was fired in retaliation for filing a complaint of workplace discrimination.

Retaliation against workers who lodge claims of workplace discrimination is illegal under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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Why do Workplaces Attack? Learn more about the Psychology of Workplace Retaliation. LEARN MORE

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Case Outcomes

Monetary fine: $65,000

Employer must:

  • Provide annual training to all supervisors, managers, and employees, to prevent future retaliation.
  • Provide names of employees who complained about discrimination and who were thereafter subjected to adverse employment actions.
  • Post a notice regarding workers’ rights protected by the EEOC.
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Lessons Learned from EEOC v. Newport News Industrial Corporation

  • When a worker has lodged a discrimination claim, an employer must be very cautious about any action that might be perceived as an adverse workplace action (such as termination or demotion) – even after concluding an investigation.
  • Document, investigate, and resolve every claim of discrimination.
  • Consider hiring third-party investigators to probe discrimination claims.
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